Sunday, June 30, 2013

13a (Philippine non quota immigrant visa) requirements

UPDATE JAN 21, 2015: Since this blog post is my most popular, I wanted to offer a disclaimer: This information was up to date as of my 13a application and receipt. From what I understand from perusing various expat resources, some of the requirements have changed slightly. To be honest, I have no intention of researching the updates, because I no longer have any need for 13a application. The next application I'll be going after is citizenship... but that's still 4 years away. I'm sure I'll chronicle that adventure then (assuming I still have this blog)

ORIGINALLY POSTED June 30, 2013
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As promised, here's the complete list of items you'll need to have in order to acquire your Philippine immigrant visa (based on my experience with the SF Philippine Consular General). This should be the complete list. Unfortunately, I wasn't able to access my notes as they're locked away for the moment as we continue to unpack our items to be left in the States, so right now I'm working from memory. If I find any discrepancies, I'll be sure to revise this list as soon as possible.

1). Completed Application 13a

2). Valid passport (plus two copies)
3). Birth certificate (plus copy) of applicant
4). Four Passport-eligible photos (taken within the past six months)
5). Police clearance (from all cities+states you've lived in for the past six years) (plus copy(ies))
6). NOTARIZED Medical clearance form (F.A. Form 11), accompanied by chest X-Ray AND results for the following tests: 1) stool (ova/parasite and occult blood); 2) urinalysis; and 3) complete blood test (blood serology and chemistry) (plus copies)

7). NOTARIZED letter from Filipino spouse requesting issuance of Non-quota immigrant visa (plus copy)
8). Marriage certificate (plus 2 copies)
9). Proof of Filipino citizenship of spouse (sworn oath document, if spouse holds dual-citizenship)(plus copy)
10). Passport of Filipino spouse (if available) (Plus two copies)
 - if unavailable, current passport of Filipino spouse (i.e. U.S.A. passport, etc.)

11). Original birth certificate of Filipino spouse (with two copies)
12). NOTARIZED Letter of financial capacity accompanied by proof of financial capacity (e.g. travellers cheques, latest print out showing statement of credit card account(s), latest print-out of bank account statements, ownership of real estate properties, and other documents showing the applicant’s capacity to financially support himself/herself during his/her stay in the Philippines) -- I used land that will be transferred to Jing's name once we arrive and our bank statements. ---- As a bonus, if you can get a few notarized letters from family "sponsors" living in the Philippines stating that you won't become a financial burden, it helps.

13). $150.00 USD (cash)
14). Make a personal appearance for an interview. Expect basic questions like where you plan to live, etc. Basically, you'll be asked why you're moving and what you plan to do once you're there (obviously I'm a bit young to be retiring, so I let Jing do pretty much all of the talking. The interviewer was pretty stern with me in the beginning, but once Jing started answering everything in Tagalog, the interviewer eased up and even cheerfully wished us luck at the end).

That should be it. Like I said, if I come across any documents I missed, I'll revise. Feel free to post any questions in the comments section or contact me via the sidebar.

-Trick

3 comments:

  1. Holy cow! I have a hard time finding my driver's license every morning before work, so I know I'll qualify to live there.

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  2. From what I can tell, the other Philippine consular offices are more organized and seem to know what is going on. The consular in LA has a comprehensive list, so I'm not sure why the SF consular was so different. Again, I'm just basing this on my experience, as the SF consular was the one I had to deal with directly.

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  3. we just submit an application for 13 a immigrant visa for my husband in the philippine embassy in washington dc... my question is, once we received his visa with a stamp from them, what do we need to do once we get to the philippines? im not quite sure what is the next step after getting his passport stamp.. about the financial requirement my question is if i can show to them in my bank acct that i have $10k us dollars would i be able to use it? or it needs to be in the bank at all times? i hope you can help me.. thank you very much

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